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Beglik Tash

Beglik Tash

The Thracian rock sanctuary is located on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast about 5 km from the town of Primorsko (it could be reached by asphalt and dirt road, passing through woodland) and about 40 km from Burgas. The area became known to science only in 2003 and is still studied by archaeologists and historians.
The sanctuary is known for its specifically arranged stones, with different shapes and sizes, used for different purposes. It is supposed to have been created several centuries before Christ and was destroyed in the beginning of the 4th century, as evidenced by the found in archeological excavations earthen vessels, stone tools of work and weapons, flint, coins and more.

General plan of Beglik Tash
General plan of Beglik Tash
A total of 14 different sites are located in the sanctuary. Eco trails connect Beglik Tash with nearby Maslen Cape and St. Paraskeva bay.

General view of the sanctuary
General view of the sanctuary
The visit is not guided and many visitors have the opportunity to walk freely around the area and climb the rocky landmarks.

Objects The marriage bed and the Altar
Objects The marriage bed and the Altar
The marriage bed (on the left of the photo) is a stone shaped like a bed and a carved pillow in the east of the bed. On it, the priest and the priestess ritually represented the marriage between the Sun God and the Mother Goddess.
On the right is an altar, where wells/pools are carved on the rock, in which the four sacred liquids are poured - water, wine, milk and oil. They also placed gifts and put the offerings there.

The chopped stone
The chopped stone
The stone was blown up in 1950 when the site was also used as a quarry.

Apostle Tash
Apostle Tash
Stones with a form of a giant heart. A niche is formed between the base and the stone, where many visitors manage to crawl into the narrow space and have themselves photographed.

Sun clock
Sun clock
It consisted of 16 slabs, located around a rocky platform. Today, 7 of them are still standing in their original positions, leaning into one another at an incline.

Photographer: BulgariaView, License: Creative Commons License